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Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Counters on inhaler-it's about time!!!






I just noticed this on my inhaler the other day, I knew they were putting counters on rescue inhalers, but didn't realize they were using them on maintenance inhalers. I've only been using this for 2 months!

This is my Dulera inhaler, it's my every-day maintenance (or controller) medication. Some people get a little confused by the different types of inhalers. This is one that I take EVERY DAY, whether I feel symptoms or not. You can't "feel" swelling in your lungs, but that's what can happen if you don't control your asthma.

Then if you get a simple cold on top of the swelling that is already in your lungs, it can lead to trouble. My kids and I all have allergies and asthma, which means that if we're not careful, our lungs can swell because they are constantly being annoyed by the allergens we are breathing in. It also means that we are a lot more likely to get pneumonia or bronchitis if we have a cold. And pneumonia has caused Son #2 and daughter, Kitty to be hospitalized 12 times. A simple cold isn't so simple when you have asthma.

Everyone with asthma is different, some people don't have asthma bad enough to need a medication every day. We do, but check with your doctor and see what's right for you.

And if he does want you to take a controller/maintenance medicine, make sure you follow the directions and take it EVERY DAY.

The counter will help you remember when it's time to refill. You don't just take it for a month, and then stop when the medication is empty. You get it refilled and take it every month until your doctor tells you to stop.

So, happy breathing. Check your inhaler and see if you need to refill it by using the handy dandy counter on the back. 




8 comments:

  1. Rather than commenting on the post, I would like to comment o n your profile. An Asthmatic married an asthmatic and gave birth to two asthmatic children. Andrea, you are the right individual to treat asthma patients. I believe there is nobody in the world who knows about asthma as you do. I salute your fighting spirit and wish you all the best.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by. Actually, I have 3 kids that all have asthma. Ahhh, the joy of genetics.

      But our family motto is "It Can Always Be Worse!"

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  2. I wish they'd add the counters to Qvar!

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    1. I agree! It seems like the drug companies are moving towards putting counters on more products.

      I would contact the makers of Qvar (Teva Pharmaceutical) and ask them to put counters on!

      If more of us start asking the drug companies for counters, I think they'll listen!

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  3. Counters don't seem as prevalent in the UK; I've been getting Ventolin for over a year and had about 4-5 refills of it and not one of them has had a counter. My Clenil didn't have a counter, my new IVAX Salamol doesn't, my mum's Flixotides have never had counters, my best friend's Flixotides, Ventolins and Serevents haven't either, but my Seretide I got 4 days ago does. I'm kinda happy about that, seeing as previously I had to resort to tallying my doses on the canister with a Sharpie pen.

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    1. Yes, it's been very helpful. It falls under the category of "why didn't anyone think of this before??!!"

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  4. In the UK, GSK seems to be moving kind of slowly with the introduction of counters on inhalers (out of my friend's countless Flixotide and Serevent Rxs, and my mum's Flixotide Rxs, my Seretide and mine and my friend's Ventolins, only my Seretide has a counter on it) but I emailed them earlier in this regard.
    I also put on a footnote about the plastic thingy on Advair and Ventolin in the USA which holds the cap to the actuator. What are these called?

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    1. Hmm, good question. I'm not sure. There is a little plastic string that connects the cap to the inhaler. It's helpful so you don't lose it.

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