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Friday, June 15, 2018

"Stock albutero"l inhalers in schools

(Infographic courtesy of Allergy & Asthma Network) 

What is "stock albuterol?" 

Well, that means schools can "stock" (or store) an albuterol inhaler in school - in case someone has an emergency.

 Shouldn't everyone have their own inhaler? Well, in a perfect world, yes. Inhalers are small and can be easily lost, left at home, or even expire before they are empty.

I have heard many stories of families that can't afford an inhaler, so 3 or 4 kids are sharing one inhaler at school. Or sometimes mom takes the inhaler to work, and if the school nurse calls her, she will take the inhaler to the school for her child to use. They family shares 1 inhaler between mom or dad's office and the school.

I don't know about any of you, but I had moments of panic when I couldn't find my inhaler - even though I KNEW it was in my purse.


This is why there are stock inhalers in schools.


11 states allow schools to stock albuterol inhalers. Is your state one of the lucky states? You can check the graphic up above. The dark blue states are schools that have stock albuterol laws. Yellow states have guidelines.

Looks like my state needs some work!

What about your state? Ask your school nurse, superintendent or your local legislator why your school doesn't allow stock albuterol inhaler for emergencies. 

You can also contact Allergy & Asthma Network. They are based in Virginia and are:

"Allergy & Asthma Network is the leading nonprofit organization whose mission is to end the needless death and suffering due to asthma, allergies and related conditions through outreach, education, advocacy and research."
Allergy & Asthma Network sponsor a Day on Capitol Hill in Washington DC each May. They work tirelessly on laws to protect families and help create new laws for families with allergies and asthma.

I was lucky enough to go to DC and talk to my legislators. It's not that scary, you just share your story of living with allergies and asthma. Many of us have some pretty scary and powerful stories of dealing with allergies or asthma. You can talk to your local or state legislators too.

Allergy & Asthma Network can explain how to talk to your local legislators, PTA, etc and educate them about important issues with allergies and asthma. 


Lend your voice! You can help make a difference!


Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Don't forget asthma inhalers when school is out!


(Shutterstock image)

School is out for summer in most states, and that means emptying out the backpack your kids have been carrying around all year (how long has THAT been in there?)
 
As you empty out their backpacks, make sure you check for their asthma inhaler.
 
Some kids will have an inhaler at home and another one at school. Sometimes you can forget about the inhaler at school. 
 
Older kids usually carry their inhalers in their backpacks, but the younger kids might have theirs stored in the teacher's desk.
 
By the way, did you know it's legal in every state in American for kids to carry their inhaler with them at school? American Lung Association says:
 
"Although all 50 states and the District of Columbia have passed a law allowing students to carry and use inhalers at school, some kids are still being denied access to these lifesaving medications during the school day."
 
When my kids were little, I would fill out a permission form at the beginning of every school year and Asthma Specialist would sign it. That would allow them to legally carry their inhaler with them at all times (even though schools are a drug free zone.)
 
Since our family has had LOTS of experience with asthma (it's been 18 years since the 3 kids and I were diagnosed - and we had had 12 hospitalizations for asthma). So, we are very used to inhalers and nebulizers. My kids were responsible enough to carry their inhaler when they were very young. 
 
But other families may find that young kids goof off with inhalers (spray it in their air, let their friends play with it, etc.) So they may have the teacher keep it in his or her desk. 
 
So, do the "end of the year dump"of the backpack and look for your kid's inhaler. If you can't find it, you may have to double check with their teacher or school nurse.
 
Chances are you are going to need that over the summer!