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Thursday, July 13, 2017

My inhaler is empty? When did that happen?





One of the most common things I see when I am helping families with asthma is expired inhalers or empty inhalers.

Check yours now. Go ahead.....I'll wait.

Well? What was the date?

Was it expired?

Was it empty?

It's one of those things you don't think to check. I just carry my inhaler around all the time in case I need it and don't think to check the number of doses left or the expiration date. I just assume it will always be there when I need it.

And I LOVE that they put counters on the back of inhalers, but you actually have to LOOK at it!

I was on a work trip out of state and my lungs weren't feeling well. I chalked that up to the Texas humidity. But I just didn't feel right. 

I happen to check my daily controller inhaler - but it was empty! I don't even know how long it was empty, but the counter was at 0. That would explain the cranky lungs!

I have had families that were surprised that their inhaler was on 0. They will try a puff in the air and then look at me as if to say, "See? It still has medicine in it!"



"... the medicine often runs out before other substances that are used to make the medicine come out of the container. So what you hear, see, or taste might only be these substances, not the medicine. Breathing these substances without the medicine could cause your symptoms to worsen." 

 So, just because something comes out of the inhaler when it's on "0" doesn't mean that it's medicine.  Some still have propellant, but no medicine.

So take a peek at your rescue inhaler and your controller inhaler or diskus.

You want to make sure it's not expired or empty when you need it. 

Because nothing is scarier than needing an inhaler and finding that it is expired or empty! Yikes!!
 








Wednesday, July 5, 2017

It's official - I hate neighborhood fireworks!


video

** You'll have to turn up your sound if you want to hear the video**

Yes, I love my country! In fact, we attend parades, decorate the entire house (inside and outside) with patriotic decorations and buntings.

I also LOVE watching "A Capitol 4th" and the other programs PBS broadcasts for Veteran's Day and Memorial Day. 

In fact, my dad was a waist gunner on a B-17 during WWII.  And I proudly display his old black and white photos with his squad.

But, none of those make it hard for me to breathe.

Fireworks do. 

I'm not against those fabulous aerial fireworks that the cities light off during festivals. 

I have a REALLY hard time with neighborhood fireworks. It's not just one neighbor lighting off fireworks and making the air smoky. It's a combination of street, after street, after street, of neighbors lighting off fireworks.

Not to mention all the sirens I hear and the firefighters probably rushing to yet another house fire or field fire - thanks to fireworks!

So, what's the answer?

I don't know. I can't tell neighbors that they can't light off fireworks. Although in some areas of our valley they are illegal due to fire risk.

I stay inside and keep the doors and windows shut. But am not sure what else we can do. I mean, I have to leave the house at times, and that means walking to my detached garage (about 10 steps.) That's all it takes for me to breathe in a little smoke and to wreak havoc on my lungs.

Sometimes it's just discouraging having asthma...