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Monday, October 16, 2017

Trying to stay healthy....

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Well, it's that time of year again. Co-workers and family members are sniffling, wiping their noses and coughing.

And I am trying to AVOID them. 

Not easy when you live with one of them, and work with an office of sick people. 

The possibilities for germs are endless. And I try to avoid all of them. 

I use my sleeve to open doors (I'm not touching those handles!) I use my knuckle to punch the elevator button and then wash my hands when I finally get to my office.

I wash my hands after I touch the handle to the microwave and office fridge. Seriously....does anyone else have one of "those " office fridges that no one cleans out? I am tired of being the only one to clean the fridge, and have left that to someone else. I know no one is going to take time to clean the fridge handle if they can't clean the inside of the fridge!

And don't get me started on the people that don't wash their hands after they use the bathroom at work. Seriously?! I work with nurses! They should know better! I use a paper towel to open the bathroom door. 

Even out in public, I have to be careful. I just made a quick trip to the grocery store and always use the pop up canister of disinfecting wipes on the cart handle. Then, when I'm done and go out to my car, I use my pop up canister to wipe my hands again. 

 
Overkill? Nope, not when you have asthma! 

I had bronchitis this spring  and was VERY sick and missed a week of work. I also had to have a course of prednisone to get the swelling down in my lungs. However, prednisone can impair your immune system, so I have to be really careful now.  

Can avoid getting sick? Maybe not, but I am going to try!
 

Monday, October 9, 2017

Teal pumpkins for Halloween?





https://www.foodallergy.org/education-awareness/teal-pumpkin-project

Why am I talking about the Teal Pumpkin Project? I mean, what does that have to do with asthma?

Well, a lot! 

70% of people that have asthma also have allergies (and many of those have food allergies, not just seasonal allergies.)  

In fact, I was just telling my co-workers how our family has to inspect ALL of the food we eat - family parties, work parties, church parties and even restaurants. EVERY time I eat at a restaurant, I have to ask the wait staff to make sure that my chicken breast is not cooked anywhere near seafood. I also have to remind them not to use the same utensils on my chicken that they are using on the seafood.

On Saturday, we went to lunch at a local bakery and sandwich shop and Son #2 ordered a gourmet grilled cheese sandwich. He knew that they make their own breads there, including some with nuts. So, he asked them to make sure there was no cross contamination. He told me that the cashier just looked at him with a blank look on her face.

So, Mama Bear came out, and I marched back up the counter and caught the eye of the manager and repeated our request. I let her know that I have an epinephrine auto injector, but would prefer not to use it. 

She said that she would make sure his sandwich is not cross contaminated by a knife, cutting board, or anything else that was used to slice bread with nuts. (The repeated requests get really old after a while......some people are quick to understand and help, while others look at us like we really weird. Which we are - but that is beside the point. )
 
Sometimes, I will pull out my epinephrine auto injector and show them so they know I am serious! 

Son #2 is in college now, but when he was younger, Halloween was a tough time because there are so many treats with tree nuts (cookies, candy, brownies, etc). Some kids are allergic to peanuts too, and that can make Trick or Treating a little scary! (Think costumes are scary? Try avoiding accidental exposure to a food allergen in Halloween candy!)

FARE (Food Allergy and Research & Education) has an entire website devoted to the Teal Pumpkin Project. What is that? The project is dedicated to:

"Raising awareness of food allergies and promoting inclusion of all trick-or-treaters throughout the Halloween season"

You can print out flyers, coloring pages, lawn signs  - all sorts of Teal Pumpkin Project to let parents know that your house is a place where they can trick or treat for allergy safe treats. 



Some families will only stock non-food treats. Other families will have 2 bowls - one with candy and one with non-food treats. FARE also has ideas for non-food treats (glow sticks, bubbles, mini slinkies, etc) Do whatever works for you!


So if you are shopping for Halloween candy, consider picking up some allergy-friendly Halloween candy or non-food treats for kids with food allergies.

We want them to be safe and happy and have a fun Halloween too! 

Monday, October 2, 2017

Asthma as a family disease


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Like many chronic diseases, asthma doesn't just affect the person who has it - it affects the whole family.

When my kids were little, they were sick - a LOT! And they were hospitalized 12 times (usually with pneumonia.) And it was always a tough time for the whole family.

And that meant plans went out the window. Sleepovers were cancelled, dinner was missed, and basic things around the house were neglected.

When one of the kids was in the hospital, that's all we would focus on. Who would spend the day/night at the hospital, who would spend the day/night at home with the other kids.

We would run out of groceries, the lawn would need to be mowed, homework would be skipped. Soccer practice? Nope. Scouts? Sometimes.

We would fit in whatever we could.

I remember driving home from the hospital late one night with Son #1 while Hubby stayed at the hospital for the night. (Son #2 and daughter Kitty were both in the hospital with pneumonia.)

We were almost home when Son #1 said, "Hey mom, the new term starts tomorrow and I need gym shorts since I'm starting a gym class." Not kidding. 

It was 10:00 at night. 

I was exhausted, had a killer headache, and just wanted to climb into bed. 

So, what's the closest store that is near me and open late - and carries gym shorts? Well, we started out at Target and had Walmart as a back up. Luckily, there was one pair of black gym shorts left in his size - what are the odds? We were in luck!

In the early years, we muddled through parenting and never won "Parent of the Year!" awards.

Were we perfect parents? No. Did the other kids get neglected? Yep. 

Did we muddle through and all survive? 

Yes.


Asthma also affected our jobs.

Hubby and I would often miss work as we tried to juggle kids in the hospital and kids at home. The kids weren't hospitalized EVERY time they were sick, sometimes they were just sick enough that they would need to stay home and miss 4 or 5 days of school. So, that meant one of us would need to stay home to take care of the kids.

What can you do when you have a kid with asthma who seems to always be sick? I would let the kid's teachers know that they had a brother or sister in the hospital and that my child may need extra love and attention that week.

I would let the neighbors or grandparents take the kids to scouts, dance, soccer games and out to dinner.

When people would ask, "What can I do?" I would tell them! 

Do you have time to drop by the pharmacy? Can you pick up milk and bread at the grocery store? 

It takes a village to raise a child, so call on your fellow villagers when you need a little extra help.