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Monday, September 21, 2015

Wildfires and asthma


(Shutterstock image)

Many of you who read my blog know that I am VERY nervous when it comes to forest fires. Son #2 ended up in ICU and almost died several years ago when we had a fire here. The whole valley filled with smoke (and smoke and asthma are NOT a good mix!)


It's so scary to read about what is happening to people with asthma in California. Did you know they  had to close schools in Central California?! (I know that's every kid's dream - that school is closed - but I'm not sure if that means they are stuck in their house of if they can take off to the beach.)

The article says, "Record drought in the Western US that has contributed to an explosive wildfire season is sending droves of wheezing, coughing patients to physicians and asthma clinics."
No wonder people with asthma are having a hard time! In the article, they list all of the pollutants in the smoke (it's a long list and I can't pronounce half of the list). 

And with no rain in sight, there's nothing to help with the fires. Dr. Vipul Jain, is a University of California San Francisco pulmonologist. He says that
"Patients feel it coming. Typically patients with COPD and asthma. They get coughing spasms because their lungs are trying to expel the irritants."

He tells them to stay indoors, use their inhalers, and keep the windows closed at night.

Another doctor from Bakersfield, Dr. Thu Yein, is also a pulmonologist and critical care specialist at San Joaquin Community Hospital. He says he sees patients too from forest fires. 

"It's usually within 3 weeks of a forest fire. It happens every year."   
I feel sorry for all of the people in California that have asthma. I know how hard it is to try to breathe when the valley is filled with smoke. When the fires first started in California, the smoke covered our state (2 states away!) We had to keep our windows closed for a week, turn the air cleaners on full speed, and stay inside. I can't imagine being stuck in that smoke week after week.

And how do the fire fighters stand being out in that thick smoke?

All I can say is that I am keeping my fingers crossed for rain for California! Just not too much - because then they would have flash floods.......
Record drought in the Western US that has contributed to an explosive wildfire season is sending droves of wheezing, coughing patients to physicians and asthma clinics. - See more at: http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/pulmonology-crisis-wildfires-have-the-west-wheezing#sthash.4QDUuzLl.dpuf
Record drought in the Western US that has contributed to an explosive wildfire season is sending droves of wheezing, coughing patients to physicians and asthma clinics. - See more at: http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/pulmonology-crisis-wildfires-have-the-west-wheezing#sthash.4QDUuzLl.dpuf
Record drought in the Western US that has contributed to an explosive wildfire season is sending droves of wheezing, coughing patients to physicians and asthma clinics. - See more at: http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/pulmonology-crisis-wildfires-have-the-west-wheezing#sthash.4QDUuzLl.dpuf
 

 


3 comments:

  1. Hi,

    My name is Krista, and I work for the marketing group Acurian, Inc., the leading provider of patient recruitment services for clinical trial research. We are currently assisting our client (a large pharmaceutical company) with finding patients who have asthmato participate in research study.

    I am sure you aware that, in spite of huge advances in medical science, millions of people still lack effective treatment to help manage their conditions. Often, their only hope is that researchers will find new and better treatments. This can only be done through clinical trials. Every year, pharmaceutical companies develop new and potentially life-saving medications. In order to bring those medications to the market, they first must go through a rigorous clinical trial process. Put simply – no clinical trials means no new drugs or treatments. So, whether you have a condition or not, clinical trials affect you. At Acurian, we assist pharmaceutical companies with finding people that meet specific conditions and facilitate awareness of new trials that may be of interest to them.

    To that end, I would be very interested in speaking with you about the opportunity to post a link for patients with asthma to screen for a current clinical trial. We can set up unique tracking for you, so that you can be compensated for every referral that is generated through your link. We typically pay out anywhere from $40 - $100 per referral. We work with many non-profits and bloggers that generate revenue in this manner. If you would like to talk further, please feel free to respond by email at philadelphia@acurian.com.

    Thank you and I look forward to speaking with you.

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  2. Dear Asthma mom :)
    I am a design student at the TU Delft. Together with my group I am designing for children with asthma. We hope to empower kids with asthma and to improve their wellbeing and quality of life. We would love for you to be involved in our project, we all feel your blog is so inspiring! If you would like to get in touch - we would be so happy! You can send us an email at designstudiocatch@gmail.com, if you want to. I hope to hear from you, and in any case: keep writing your blog! We are all sure it is of great inspiration and help to many people accross the web! All the best, Thomas

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  3. I'm a Nigerian and we use natural remedies to cure asthma...why not try out this easy recipe??? A mixture of honey and castor oil 5:1 (a Tbsp morning and evening)...
    *NB* Not to be taken by pregnant women. Thanks. I'll await your testimonies.

    ReplyDelete