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Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Cleaning causes asthma attacks?







Cleaning itself won't cause asthma attacks (those of you that hate cleaning can't use that as an excuse not to clean......)

But for me, cleaning and dust are not a good mix. I was cleaning out a closet yesterday, and noticed some of those things have been in there for at least 4 years. It was pretty dusty, which is a problem when you have asthma. I dragged everything out so I could sort through things. And that's when my nose seemed a little stuffy. Then I started sneezing. Then my throat started feeling "twitchy"- like I needed to cough.

So I coughed. And coughed. And coughed. And coughed.

I realized I was having another asthma attack. Sigh. I grabbed my inhaler from my purse and sat down. I tried to calm down and not breathe so fast. I haven't used my inhaler for a while, so I pulled the spacer off the inhaler and primed the inhaler (you just squirt a puff into the air.)

Then I put the inhaler and spacer back together and took a puff of Albuterol. I concentrated on my breathing, and tried to relax a little. I also had a I drink of water, which seemed to help. I have to time it just right so I don't choke on the water. It took a while, but the coughing slowed down. Of course then I had junk in my lungs I had to cough up for the next little while. Fun stuff!!

Usually, doctors will tell you to avoid the triggers (or causes) of asthma attacks. To learn more about other asthma triggers, check out the Mayo Clinic. I would have LOVED to have someone else clean out my dusty closet, but no one was around. There isn't an easy answer for preventing an asthma attack with dust. Wear a mask? Tie a scarf over my nose and mouth next time? Clean more often so the dust doesn't build up?

You just have to be careful with asthma. Doing a normal household project can cause an asthma attack. Just be careful and keep your inhaler around. You never know when you might need it.

Now about those cleaning those windows......where are my teenagers when I need them?!

7 comments:

  1. Asthma patients need to work closely with their doctors on managing asthma and living with it.

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  2. My Grandson suffers with asthma and he was on an inhaler and breathing treatments. I help them switch out their cleaning and laundry products, with green products that actually work and put him on some super antioxidants. It was pretty amazing the difference after about 6 months. He hasn't had any treatment for asthma for over 5 years and his allergies are down to a little dry cough in the Winter. Out-gassing your home is one of the most important things you can do as an asthmatic. If you need more info you can contact me at dsimpson@ida.net or 208-520-8988 I've love to help.

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  3. Hi Freedom Team, thanks for stopping by!! The environment is so important in the home. We have gone all through our house and followed suggestions of our Asthma Specialist to make it allergy and asthma friendly. We don't use any strong chemical cleaners, instead we use environmentally safe products.

    Since there is no one size fits all for asthma, we work with our doctor to find the best prevention and treatment for our family. Everyone has different triggers and types of asthma. Some people have either mild, moderate or severe asthma.

    And each of those require a little different treatment plan.

    We're lucky that our kid's asthma has stabilized for now.

    Glad your grandson is doing well!! :)

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  4. If cleaning appears to trigger your allergic asthma symptoms,wear a dust visor that fits well over your nose and mouth when you dust and vacuum.Then again if possible,request that another person to do the cleaning.
    ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
    http://homevacuumzone.com

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    Replies
    1. Bonnie,

      This is an old post. Now I am more careful if I clean out an area that is a little dusty.

      Better yet....I have my hubby do it so I don't get an asthma attack!

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