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Thursday, August 31, 2017

Cleaning up after a flood

I have seen some pretty unbelievable videos and photos images from Houston and surrounding areas this past week. They have left me speechless (and that's pretty hard to do....)

How can I help? Well, I have already donated money to the Red Cross. But, as Environmental Health Educator (and nerd for all things science), maybe I can help with a little knowledge about cleaning up?
We had a small flood in our basement a few years ago (nothing like Houston.) We had a 100 year rainstorm that cascaded down our basement stairs, overwhelmed the french drain, and rushed into the basement. 

It wasn't even close to the amount of water I am seeing in photos from Houston, but enough that we were overwhelmed. And of course insurance didn't cover it because it was "An Act of God."

So, we were on our own. The disaster companies were busy with other homes and businesses who were damaged more than we were, so I recalled my training from the National Center for Healthy Housing training. I'll spare you my story, but it took 6 weeks for the basement to dry out enough so we could re-carpet (FYI - concrete can LOOK dry....but may not be.)

Here's a photo of Hubby using a moisture meter from the hardware store to test the moisture in the basement floor. 

If your house has been damaged by flooding, here is some important info from FEMA:

    

"Cleaning up After a Flood:"

"The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) advises the homeowner to take the following steps:
  • Wear protective clothing. Rubber gloves and boots will help protect you from bacteria and possible infections.
  • Avoid putting your hands near your face or mouth when working.
  • Be sure the main power source to your home or business is turned off.
  • Check for shifts in the house or building and cracks in the foundation.
  • Open doors and windows to help dry out the rooms.
  • Remove any standing water. Basements should be pumped out slowly, about one-third of the water each day. Water soaked grounds can cause a collapse of basement walls.
  • Clean up mud, silt and other debris before they dry out.
  • Hose down walls as quickly as possible and follow up with a second hosing with water containing bleach or a disinfectant. Disinfect surfaces, like shelves.
  • Appliances that contain insulation cannot be easily cleaned. Have them checked by a service person before attempting to use.
  • Remove all soaked materials and furnishings. Fully upholstered furnishings and mattresses cannot be cleaned and should be destroyed to avoid health problems.
  • Carpets and rugs may be cleaned. Permanently attached carpeting should be removed before attempting to clean. Clean items out of doors or have them done professionally.
  • Items like sheets, bedspreads, curtains and draperies should be washed with very hot water and detergents, or professionally dry-cleaned.
  • Any flooded food items should be discarded unless they are in undamaged cans or commercially sealed glass jars. Sanitize the container before opening it.
  • Sanitize pots, pans, utensils, dishes, glassware and other items you intend to keep."
Centers for Disease Control (CDC) also has info about how to "Be Safe After a Hurricane." 
And "Clean Up Your Home."

  Every situation is different. FEMA mentions cleaning carpet - but our was sopping wet and the disaster companies were overwhelmed, so there was no place to take the carpet to let it dry out and then clean it. So, we ended up tearing out the HEAVY water logged wool berber carpet (and pad) and replacing it - at our cost.

Our flood pales in comparison to Houston's flooding. Please be careful and follow FEMA's suggestions. I know that homes in many areas still have water up to the roof tops. No telling how long it will take for the water to recede.

And watch your asthma. Water, mold and asthma are NOT a good mix. 

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